1 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
According to the passage, which of the following is not true ?
A.  High cost in insurance sector is one of the sectors restricting the steady growth of the sector
B.  The present distribution models of insurance are not positioned to draw maximum profits.
C.  Until very recently, the insurance sector witnessed a high growth phase.
D.  Insurance products have witnessed changes from when they first came into existence.
E.  All the options are true according to the passage
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2 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following is nearly the SAME in meaning to the word given in bold as used in the passage ?
POISED
A.  dignified
B.  set
C.  posed
D.  composed
E.  alerted
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3 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
According to the passage, which of the following will be the result of increased FDI in the insurance sector ?
(A) Inclusion of insurance in financial planning of individuals as well as the country.
(B) Making insurance products available in areas previously under insured.
(C) Creation of more jobs in the sector.
A.  Only B
B.  Only B and C
C.  Only A and B
D.  All the three A, B and C
E.  Only A and C
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4 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following is nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning to the word given in bold as used in the passage ?
$Flux $
A.  stability
B.  mixture
C.  plainness
D.  paucity
E.  simplicity
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5 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
As mentioned in the passage, which of the following will help in providing a boost to the insurance sector in India?
A.  Running several awareness campaigns about general insurance for the general public
B.  Increased investment by foreign companies in the sector
C.  Integrating technology into the insurance sector
D.  Force-selling a select number of insurance products to the public, thereby making it popular.
E.  Allocating a greater percentage of the country's budget for the insurance sector.
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6 . In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.
Pull a spring, let it go and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back $(1)$ quite suddenly it won't. What was once a spring has become a useless piece of curly wire. And that in a nutshell is what many scientists $(2)$ may happen to the Earth if its systems are stretched like those of an abused spring. Perhaps of this concern, in the autumn of 2009, was the $(3)$ of planetary boundaries. In the run up to that year's climate conference in Copenhagen a group of scientists defined what they thought of as a safe operating space for human $(4)$ - a set of nine limits beyond which people should not push their planet. The nine areas of concern were climate change, ocean acidification, the thinning of the ozone layer, intervention in the nitrogen and phosphate cycles (crucial to planet growth). $(5)$ of wilderness to farms and cities extinctions, the build-up of chemical pollutants and the level of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. For seven of these areas the scientists felt confident enough to put numbers to these boundaries and since then this concept has taken root.
(1)
A.  after
B.  because
C.  to
D.  until
E.  forth
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7 . In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.
Pull a spring, let it go and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back $(1)$ quite suddenly it won't. What was once a spring has become a useless piece of curly wire. And that in a nutshell is what many scientists $(2)$ may happen to the Earth if its systems are stretched like those of an abused spring. Perhaps of this concern, in the autumn of 2009, was the $(3)$ of planetary boundaries. In the run up to that year's climate conference in Copenhagen a group of scientists defined what they thought of as a safe operating space for human $(4)$ - a set of nine limits beyond which people should not push their planet. The nine areas of concern were climate change, ocean acidification, the thinning of the ozone layer, intervention in the nitrogen and phosphate cycles (crucial to planet growth). $(5)$ of wilderness to farms and cities extinctions, the build-up of chemical pollutants and the level of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. For seven of these areas the scientists felt confident enough to put numbers to these boundaries and since then this concept has taken root.
(2)
A.  knowing
B.  worry
C.  study
D.  assuming
E.  guesses
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8 . In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.
Pull a spring, let it go and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back $(1)$ quite suddenly it won't. What was once a spring has become a useless piece of curly wire. And that in a nutshell is what many scientists $(2)$ may happen to the Earth if its systems are stretched like those of an abused spring. Perhaps of this concern, in the autumn of 2009, was the $(3)$ of planetary boundaries. In the run up to that year's climate conference in Copenhagen a group of scientists defined what they thought of as a safe operating space for human $(4)$ - a set of nine limits beyond which people should not push their planet. The nine areas of concern were climate change, ocean acidification, the thinning of the ozone layer, intervention in the nitrogen and phosphate cycles (crucial to planet growth). $(5)$ of wilderness to farms and cities extinctions, the build-up of chemical pollutants and the level of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. For seven of these areas the scientists felt confident enough to put numbers to these boundaries and since then this concept has taken root.
(3)
A.  value
B.  conflict
C.  supply
D.  set
E.  idea
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9 . In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.
Pull a spring, let it go and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back $(1)$ quite suddenly it won't. What was once a spring has become a useless piece of curly wire. And that in a nutshell is what many scientists $(2)$ may happen to the Earth if its systems are stretched like those of an abused spring. Perhaps of this concern, in the autumn of 2009, was the $(3)$ of planetary boundaries. In the run up to that year's climate conference in Copenhagen a group of scientists defined what they thought of as a safe operating space for human $(4)$ - a set of nine limits beyond which people should not push their planet. The nine areas of concern were climate change, ocean acidification, the thinning of the ozone layer, intervention in the nitrogen and phosphate cycles (crucial to planet growth). $(5)$ of wilderness to farms and cities extinctions, the build-up of chemical pollutants and the level of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. For seven of these areas the scientists felt confident enough to put numbers to these boundaries and since then this concept has taken root.
(4)
A.  suffering
B.  view
C.  catastrophe
D.  victims
E.  development
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10 . In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.
Pull a spring, let it go and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back $(1)$ quite suddenly it won't. What was once a spring has become a useless piece of curly wire. And that in a nutshell is what many scientists $(2)$ may happen to the Earth if its systems are stretched like those of an abused spring. Perhaps of this concern, in the autumn of 2009, was the $(3)$ of planetary boundaries. In the run up to that year's climate conference in Copenhagen a group of scientists defined what they thought of as a safe operating space for human $(4)$ - a set of nine limits beyond which people should not push their planet. The nine areas of concern were climate change, ocean acidification, the thinning of the ozone layer, intervention in the nitrogen and phosphate cycles (crucial to planet growth). $(5)$ of wilderness to farms and cities extinctions, the build-up of chemical pollutants and the level of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. For seven of these areas the scientists felt confident enough to put numbers to these boundaries and since then this concept has taken root.
(5)
A.  problem
B.  conversation
C.  hope
D.  effects
E.  consequence
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