1 . Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)
The city joined a league of (1)/ seventy other cities from across the globe (2)/ for a city-to-city collaboration to tackling (3)/ climate change and increase urban resilience. (4)/ No error (5)
A.  The city joined a league of
B.  seventy other cities from across the globe
C.  for a city-to-city collaboration to tackling
D.  climate change and increase urban resilience
E.  No error
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2 . Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)
India is set to (1)/ import eight million barrels of oil (2)/ to fill (3)/ its first Strategic Petroleum Reserve. (4)/ No error (5)
A.  India is set to
B.  import eight million barrels of oil
C.  to fill
D.  its first Strategic Petroleum Reserve
E.  No error
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3 . Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)
A uniform policy for (1)/ regularising and redeveloping illegal and old buildings, (2)/ is being submit to the government (3)/ by the end of this month. (4)/ No error (5)
A.  A uniform policy for
B.  regularising and redeveloping illegal and old buildings,
C.  is being submit to the government
D.  by the end of this month
E.  No error
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4 . Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)
Before paying the developer's sales (1)/ office a visit, make sure you are aware on (2)/ the fancy marketing pitches being used (3)/ by them to lure potential buyers. (4)/ No error (5)
A.  Before paying the developer's sales
B.  office a visit, make sure you are aware on
C.  the fancy marketing pitches being used
D.  by them to lure potential buyers
E.  No error
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5 . Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)
Thousands of international travellers was (1)/ stranded at (2)/ the airport as fifty pilots (3)/ from Airline A went on strike. (4)/ No error (5)
A.  Thousands of international travellers was
B.  stranded at
C.  the airport as fifty pilots
D.  from Airline A went on strike
E.  No error
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6 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following is nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning to the word given in bold as used in the passage ? Welcome
A.  unwanted
B.  receptive
C.  leaving
D.  bidding
E.  distanced
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7 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following is nearly the SAME in meaning to the word given in $bold$ as used in the passage ?
Dichotomy
A.  branching
B.  multiplicity
C.  homogeneity
D.  breakage
E.  contrast
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8 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
According to the passage, which of the following can be said about the present position of insurance sector in India ?
(A) The efforts made by the Government to boost this sector are being met with a lot of resistance from the public.
(B) The amount of money invested in the sector is not in sync with the number of people insured.
(C) The number of insurance companies in India is very high.
A.  Only C
B.  All A,B and C
C.  Only B and C
D.  Only A and C
E.  Only B
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9 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following can be the most suitable title for the passage ?
A.  The Insurance Sector in India-Poised for a Downfall
B.  The Road to Growth of the Insurance sector in India
C.  Insurance Sector-The Highest Revenue Generator
D.  Underprivileged and Under-Insured Indians
E.  Why the Insurance Sector Will Never Quite Flourish
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10 . Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question. Certain words are given in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.
India being viewed as a land of contradictions is a fairly common refrain. From bustling metropolies to lightless villages, there is a huge variance in different aspects of life. Nowhere is this variance as amply clear as it is in the insurance sector in India. Consider this, with 52 insurance companies, India's insurance sector is one of the largest in the world in terms of volumes of money involved. And yet, insurance is not as pervasive in India as it should be, as only about 25 percent of the people have general insurance cover. This $dichotomy$ of market-size and market cover is the biggest lacunae in the sector, lacunae that the government hopes to fill through privatisation. Yet the road to FDI is fraught with many roadblocks. Successive governments have failed in opening up the sector, despite numerous attempts, leading to lot of confusion and conundrum. As a result the whole sector is in a $flux$. Even so, the insurance sector is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 12-15 percent in the next five years.
The insurance sector opened up in 2001 with the foreign direct investment (FDI) limit being set to 26 percent. According to various reports this sector has subsequently witnessed two phases, one that saw high growth between 2001 and 2010 and the other a dormant period between 2010 and 2012, However, apart from these periods of rapid and moderate growth the industry has also seen product and operational innovations, given the increase in competition.
As of FY 13, the total marketsize of this sector was US$ 66.4 billion and is expected to touch US$ 350-400 billion by 2020. According to experts, while India's insurance industry is no doubt growing and is $poised$ to grow further, it is also facing profitability issues on account of distribution and operating models. It pegs the cumulative losses to private life insuers in the excess of Rs. 187 billion till March 2012. Slow growth, rising costs and stalled reforms are further hindering the steady growth of this industry.
If the announcement made in the Union Budget 2014-15 is anything to go by, the future of this sector looks optimistic. Taking a reformative step, the Finance Minister had proposed increasing the FDI cap in the insurance to 49 percent To this effect, in July 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved 49% FDI in insurance, thus green-flagging reforms in the sector. This is a $welcome$ move for the insurance industry which was looking to raise more capital from overseas for quite some time now. The investment starved sector has definitely got a boost. Insurance penetration in India is on a decline in 2010. Insurance penetration was 4.4 percent, which further dipped to 3.17 percent in 2012-13. For insurance penetration to increase, the sector will need huge amounts of capital investment and the hike in FDI cap will only make this easier. As the sector expands, it will also lead to job creation in the sector. As more capital flows into the insurance sector and the manpower increases, it will be easier for insurance companies to tap under-insured markets. By 2020, India's insurable population is expected to touch 75 crore. As a result, the importance of life insurance in financial planning is only set to increase.
With the new government stress on reforms, steps taken by IRDA to make insurance more consumer-friendly and India's favourable demographics, the future of India's insurance industry looks good. However, it remains to be seen how this sector impacts the unbanked sections of India, in the years to come.
Which of the following is true according to the passage ?
(A) By 2020 the insurance sector is expected to grow at least by around four hundred percent from 2013.
(B) The authorities are taking efforts to make insurance products easily understandable and available.
(C) Previous efforts of the government to open up the insurance sector have met with failure.
A.  Only A and B
B.  Only A
C.  All the three A, B and C
D.  Only B
E.  Only B and C
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